Showing posts with label europe. Show all posts
Showing posts with label europe. Show all posts

Thursday, May 5, 2022

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control on May 4, 2022 (Subscription)

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There are newer versions of this map available. To see them, view all Ukraine articles on PolGeoNow.

Research by Djordje Djukic. Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic

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Map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine over two months into the Russian invasion (May 4, 2022). In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbass region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces control a large strip of territory just north of Crimea, including Kherson city and parts of Mariupol, as well as large additional areas of Donetsk and Luhansk, and other areas of Ukraine's northeast. Ukrainian capital city Kyiv (Kiev) is no longer under siege. Map includes key locations from the news, such as including Izium, Popasna, Rubizhne, the Azovstal steel plant in Mariupol, and more. Colorblind accessible. Recent changes to the map of control in Ukraine have been subtle, with Russia continuing its gradual advance, but Ukrainian forces also recapturing some areas. Ukraine also seems to have begun a campaign of covert attacks across the border into Russia.

See all this and more on the latest update to PolGeoNow's concise, professional Ukraine war control map, which includes a timeline of changes since our previous Ukraine map report of April 18, with sources cited.


This map and report are premium content, available to paid subscribers of the PolGeoNow Conflict Mapping Service.

Want to see before you subscribe? Check out our most recent FREE SAMPLE Ukraine map!

Exclusive map report includes:

  • Up-to-date illustration of current territorial control in Ukraine, color-coded for the Ukrainian government on one side and the Russian military and allied rebels on the other side, with areas of uncertainty indicated. Colorblind accessible.
  • Darker color indicating which areas were already under Russian or allied control before the 2022 invasion began
  • Claimed borders of the Russia-backed, self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic and Lugansk People's Republic in the eastern Donbass region.
  • Detailed indication of city-by-city control, including key towns and other locations important to current events
  • Locations of recent control changes and other important events, including Izium, Popasna, Rubizhne, the Azovstal steel plant in Mariupol, and more
  • Detailed timeline of important events and changes to territorial control since April 18, 2022, with links to sources.

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Can I purchase just this map?
This map and report are not available for automated purchase to non-subscribers. If you need access or republication rights for only this map report, contact service@polgeonow.com for options.

Tuesday, April 19, 2022

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control on April 18, 2022

There are newer versions of this map available. To see them, view all Ukraine articles on PolGeoNow.
Map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine a month and a half into the Russian invasion (April 18, 2022). In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbass region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces control a large strip of territory just north of Crimea, including Kherson city and parts of Mariupol, as well as large additional areas of Donetsk and Luhansk, and other areas of Ukraine's northeast. Russia has recently withdrawn from the large area it had captured in north-central Ukraine, including around national capital city Kyiv (Kiev). Map includes key locations from the news, such as Bucha, Mariupol, Izium, Makariv, the Azovstal plant, and many more. Colorblind accessible.
Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic. Contact us for permission to use this map.

(View this article in the member area)

Timeline by Djordje Djukic

Russia Completes Withdrawal from Northern Ukraine

In the more than two weeks since PolGeoNow's previous Ukraine control map report, Russian forces have completed their withdrawal from north-central Ukraine, and are now beginning a new push to complete their control of the eastern Donbass (Donetsk and Luhansk) region. Fighting this month has largely been focused on the southeastern city of Mariupol, which is now thought to be under full Russian control except for one industrial area. If Russia completes its control there, Mariupol will be the largest city captured since the start of the 2022 invasion.

Sunday, April 3, 2022

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control on April 2, 2022 (Subscription)

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There are newer versions of this map available. To see them, view all Ukraine articles on PolGeoNow.

Research by Djordje Djukic. Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic

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Thumbnail preview of map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine over a month into the Russian invasion (April 2, 2022). In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbass region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces control a large strip of territory just north of Crimea, including Kherson city and parts of Mariupol, as well as large additional areas of Donetsk and Luhansk, and other areas of Ukraine's north and northeast. Russia has recently withdrawn from much of the area it had captured in northern Ukraine in the general area of national capital city Kyiv (Kiev). Map includes key locations from the news, such as Irpin, Vil'khivka, Rubizhne, Trostianets, Marinka, and many more. Colorblind accessible. In the past week, Russian forces have largely withdrawn from the area of capital city Kyiv and other parts of Ukraine's north. But Russia has by no means given up on its invasion, and is now shifting its military focus to consolidating control of Ukraine's east, alongside its allies in the self-proclaimed Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics.

See all this and more on the latest update to PolGeoNow's concise, professional Ukraine war control map, which includes a timeline of changes since our previous Ukraine map report of March 24, with sources cited.


This map and report are premium content, available to paid subscribers of the PolGeoNow Conflict Mapping Service.

Want to see before you subscribe? Check out our most recent FREE SAMPLE Ukraine map!

Exclusive map report includes:

  • Up-to-date illustration of current territorial control in Ukraine, color-coded for the Ukrainian government on one side and the Russian military and allied rebels on the other side, with areas of uncertainty indicated. Colorblind accessible.
  • Darker color indicating which areas were already under Russian or allied control before the 2022 invasion began
  • Claimed borders of the Russia-backed, self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic and Lugansk People's Republic in the eastern Donbass region.
  • Detailed indication of city-by-city control, including key towns and other locations important to current events
  • Locations of recent control changes and other important events, including Irpin, Vil'khivka, Rubizhne, Trostianets, Marinka, and more
  • Detailed timeline of important events and changes to territorial control since March 24, 2022, with links to sources.

SUBSCRIBERS CLICK HERE TO PROCEED TO ARTICLE AND MAP

Not signed up yet? Click here to learn more about our professional subscription service!

Can I purchase just this map?
This map and report are not available for automated purchase to non-subscribers. If you need access or republication rights for only this map report, contact service@polgeonow.com for options.

Monday, March 28, 2022

Recognition of the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics

Map of territorial control and frontlines in the Donbass region of Donetsk and Luhansk, internationally recognized as part of eastern Ukraine but partly controlled by the breakaway Donetsk People's Republic and Lugansk People's Republic. Updated for September 2020, with Minsk ceasefire lines shown. Colorblind accessible.
Areas controlled by the self-proclaimed Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics just before the Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine began. For approximate changes that have happened since, check out our Ukraine control map. (Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic. Contact us for permission to use this map.)

Donetsk and Lugansk: Unrecognized "Republics"

Though now overshadowed by the war, an important political geography event took place in the days leading up to Russia's invasion of Ukraine, changing some versions of the world's list of countries.

Back in April 2014, the month after Russia-backed separatists in the peninsula of Crimea declared their independence from Ukraine, Russia-backed rebels in Ukraine's eastern provinces of Donetsk and Luhansk also announced that they were forming independent countries: the Donetsk People's Republic (DPR) and Lugansk People's Republic (LPR). ("Luhansk" is the Ukrainian-language spelling of the place name, while "Lugansk" is the Russian-language version.)

But unlike Crimea, which had already been secured by Russia's military, and was quickly absorbed into Russia with the permission of its supposed independent government, Donetsk and Lugansk would remain unrecognized for the next eight years - not officially treated as independent countries by any other country, even Russia.*

Friday, March 25, 2022

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control on March 24, 2022 (Subscription)

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There are newer versions of this map available. To see them, view all Ukraine articles on PolGeoNow.

Research by Djordje Djukic. Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic

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Map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine one month into the Russian invasion (March 24, 2022). In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbass region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces have moved into large areas of the countryside north of Ukrainian capital city Kyiv (Kiev), along a wide swath of the northeastern border from Kyiv to the country's eastern end, and in a growing strip of territory just north of Crimea, including Kherson city and parts of Mariupol, while also expanding control somewhat in Donetsk and much more in Luhansk, covering most of that province. Map includes key locations from the news, such as Irpin, Izium (Izyum), Rubizhne, Baryshivka, Makariv, and many more. Colorblind accessible. One month into the Russian invasion of Ukraine, forces of the Ukrainian government have managed to recapture some ground from Russia. However, Russian troops have made smaller, but still significant, advances along other fronts, such as within the port city of Mariupol.

See all this and more on the latest update to PolGeoNow's concise, professional Ukraine war control map, which includes a timeline of changes since our previous Ukraine map report of March 15, with sources cited.

This map and report are premium content, available to paid subscribers of the PolGeoNow Conflict Mapping Service.

Want to see before you subscribe? Check out our most recent FREE SAMPLE Ukraine map!

Exclusive map report includes:

  • Up-to-date illustration of current territorial control in Ukraine, color-coded for the Ukrainian government on one side and the Russian military and allied rebels on the other side, with areas of uncertainty indicated. Colorblind accessible.
  • Darker color indicating which areas were already under Russian or allied control before the 2022 invasion began
  • Claimed borders of the Russia-backed, self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic and Lugansk People's Republic in the eastern Donbass region.
  • Detailed indication of city-by-city control, including key towns and other locations important to current events
  • Locations of recent control changes and other important events, including Irpin, Izium (Izyum), Rubizhne, Baryshivka, Makariv, and more
  • Detailed timeline of important events and changes to territorial control since March 15, 2022, with links to sources.

SUBSCRIBERS CLICK HERE TO PROCEED TO ARTICLE AND MAP

Not signed up yet? Click here to learn more about our professional subscription service!

Can I purchase just this map?
This map and report are not available for automated purchase to non-subscribers. If you need access or republication rights for only this map report, contact service@polgeonow.com for options.

Wednesday, March 16, 2022

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control on March 15, 2022 (Subscription)

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There are newer versions of this map available. To see them, view all Ukraine articles on PolGeoNow.


Research by Djordje Djukic. Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic

Subscribe for full access to all conflict map reports!

Thumbnail preview of map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine during the third week of the Russian invasion (March 15, 2022). In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbass region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces have moved into large areas of the countryside north of Ukrainian capital city Kyiv (Kiev), along a wide swath of the northeastern border from Kyiv to the country's eastern end, and in a growing strip of territory just north of Crimea, including Kherson city and parts of Mariupol, while also expanding control somewhat in Donetsk and much more in Luhansk, covering most of that province. Full map includes key locations from the news, such as Irpin, Izium (Izyum), Skadovsk, Mariupol, Brovary, Voznesensk, the military base near the Polish border that was hit by Russian airstrikes, and many more. Colorblind accessible. The invasion of Ukraine is still proceeding slowly in its third week. While Russian and allied rebels have filled many gaps in their control around the country's edges, they've made only small progress towards capturing any more cities. Meanwhile, most of Ukraine's interior and western half remain under Ukrainian government control.

See all this and more on the latest update to PolGeoNow's concise, professional Ukraine war control map, which includes a timeline of changes since our previous Ukraine map report of March 6, with sources cited.

This map and report are premium content, available to paid subscribers of the PolGeoNow Conflict Mapping Service.

Want to see before you subscribe? Check out our most recent FREE SAMPLE Ukraine map!

Exclusive map report includes:

  • Up-to-date illustration of current territorial control in Ukraine, color-coded for the Ukrainian government on one side and the Russian military and allied rebels on the other side, with areas of uncertainty indicated. Colorblind accessible.
  • Darker color indicating which areas were already under Russian or allied control before the 2022 invasion began
  • Claimed borders of the Russia-backed, self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic and Lugansk People's Republic in the eastern Donbass region.
  • Detailed indication of city-by-city control, including key towns and other locations important to current events
  • Locations of recent control changes and other important events, including Irpin, Izium (Izyum), Skadovsk, Mariupol, Brovary, Voznesensk, Yavoriv military base, and more
  • Detailed timeline of important events and changes to territorial control since March 6, 2022, with links to sources.

SUBSCRIBERS CLICK HERE TO PROCEED TO ARTICLE AND MAP

Not signed up yet? Click here to learn more about our professional subscription service!

Can I purchase just this map?
This map and report are not available for automated purchase to non-subscribers. If you need access or republication rights for only this map report, contact service@polgeonow.com for options.

Monday, March 7, 2022

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control on March 6, 2022

There are newer versions of this map available. To see them, view all Ukraine articles on PolGeoNow.
Map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine during the second week of the Russian invasion (March 6, 2022). In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbass region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces have moved into large areas of the countryside north of Ukrainian capital city Kyiv (Kiev), along a long slowly-growing swath of the northeastern border adjacent to Kharkiv city, and in a growing chunk of territory just north of Crimea, including Kherson city and parts of Mariupol, while also expanding control somewhat in Donetsk and much more in Luhansk, covering most of that province. Map includes key locations from the news, such as Kherson, the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant, Volnovakha, Kharkiv, Romny, Mykolaiv, Bobrovytsya, and more. Colorblind accessible.
Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic. Contact us for permission to use this map.

(Subscribers click here to view this article in the member area)

Timeline by Djordje Djukic

Ukraine Map: Russian Troops Gradually Advancing

In the week since our previous Ukraine control map report, Russia and allied rebels have continued expanding their control at a modest pace, seizing the small city of Kherson in the south, expanding separatist control to cover most of Luhansk province, and bringing the port city of Mariupol under siege. Kherson, though the largest city yet captured since the full-scale invasion began on February 24, isn't the biggest city taken from Ukraine by Russia overall, since the slightly larger Sevastopol and Simferopol in Crimea have been controlled by Russia since 2014 (meanwhile, the much larger city of Donetsk, as well as somewhat larger Luhansk, have also been controlled by pro-Russian rebels since that time).

Monday, February 28, 2022

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control on Feb. 27, 2022

There are newer versions of this map available. To see them, view all Ukraine articles on PolGeoNow.
Map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine at the end of the fourth day of the Russian invasion (February 27, 2022). In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbass region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces have moved into large areas of the countryside north of Ukrainian capital city Kyiv (Kiev), along a long swath of the northeastern border adjacent to Kharkiv city, and in a robust chunk of territory just north of Crimea, while also expanding control a small amount in Donetsk and a larger amount in Luhansk. Map includes key locations from the news, such as Melitopol, Chernobyl, Hostomel Airport, Konotop, Kupiansk, Tokmak, Vasylkiv, Ivankiv, and the Kakhovka Reservoir. Colorblind accessible.
Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic. Contact us for permission to use this map.

(Subscribers click here to view this article in the member area)

Timeline by Djordje Djukic, with additional reporting by Evan Centanni

Russian Invasion Map: Ukraine at War

Months of US warnings that Russia was planning to invade Ukraine were proven right last Thursday, as Russian troops, tanks, ships, and aircraft flooded into the neighboring country. Russia had already taken over Ukraine's southern province of Crimea in 2014, and pro-Russia separatists claimed to have split off from eastern Ukraine after seizing much of Donetsk and Luhansk provinces. But Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine is a massive new escalation, unprecedented in Europe since World War II.

The above map shows control lines as of Sunday night - just before the first round of ceasefire talks - when Russian forces had captured significant chunks of rural Ukraine, but so far not gained control of any major cities (the situation a day later remains mostly unchanged). The map is based on reporting from various news media on the status of cities and towns, with lines of control in the countryside estimated with the help of other conflict-tracking websites and social media accounts.

Saturday, December 4, 2021

Queen Elizabeth's 15 Countries: The Commonwealth Realms

Did you know Elizabeth II isn't just the Queen of England and the larger UK, but of 14 other independent countries? If that statement just raises more questions for you, read on for all the answers...

Map countries with Queen Elizabeth II as head of state, which are known as the Commonwealth realms. Includes the UK, Canada, Australia, and a number of small countries in Oceania and the Caribbean. Also shows former Commonwealth realms, including large parts of Africa and South Asia. Colorblind accessible.
Map of the Commonwealth realms (independent countries that share the monarchy with Britain). Click to enlarge. Contact us for permission to use this map.

 

This article, originally from 2012, has been revised and updated for the abolition of Barbados's monarchy in November 2021, which reduced the number of countries Queen Elizabeth II reigns over from 16 to 15.

Which countries does Queen Elizabeth reign over?

You might be surprised to learn that Queen Elizabeth II is the official queen of 15 different independent countries. Those countries are together known as the "Commonwealth realms" - a smaller subset of the Commonwealth of Nations, which also includes many queenless republics. Every one of the 15 Commonwealth realms is considered a fully-fledged independent country and a member of the UN, despite sharing the same monarch. 

Tuesday, September 29, 2020

Ukraine War Control Map & Report: September 2020

To see other maps in this series, plus a new map of Russian control in the 2022 invasion, view all Ukraine articles on PolGeoNow.
Map of territorial control and frontlines in the Donbass region of Donetsk and Luhansk, internationally recognized as part of eastern Ukraine but partly controlled by the breakaway Donetsk People's Republic and Lugansk People's Republic. Updated for September 2020, with Minsk ceasefire lines shown. Colorblind accessible.
Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic. Contact us for permission to use this map.

(Subscribers click here to view this article in the member area)

Timeline by Djordje Djukic, with additional reporting by Evan Centanni

Donbass Frontline Map

In the four years since PolGeoNow last updated our Ukraine control map, little has changed in terms of territorial boundaries in the region of eastern Europe known as the Donbass. Forces of the Russia-backed self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic (DPR) and Lugansk People's Republic (LPR) still hold a large chunk of what most of the world considers Ukraine, though their plans of formally uniting into a confederation of "Novorossiya" ("New Russia") have long gone by the wayside. But as attempts at resolving the conflict peacefully grind slowly forward, fighting has continued at a low level along the frontlines, and we have made some small changes to the map where the situation has either changed or been clarified since 2016.

Wednesday, September 23, 2020

Map & Analysis: Which Countries Recognize Kosovo in 2020?

Announcing the re-launch of our Kosovo recognition updates series! PolGeoNow will now once again be providing timely reports on when countries recognize - or un-recognize - the disputed Republic of Kosovo.

Map of Kosovo recognition, indicating which states (countries) still recognize Kosovo's independence, which have withdrawn recognition, and which claims of recognition have been denied, as of September 2020, including new addition Israel. Colorblind accessible.
Click to enlarge. By Evan Centanni, modified from public domain blank world map.
Contact us for permission to use this map.

Thursday, July 16, 2020

Bulgaria and Croatia Enter Eurozone "Waiting Room" (ERM II)

This article covers the latest changes to PolGeoNow's map of which countries use the euro.

Map of the Eurozone (euro area), showing which countries use the euro as their currency. Includes members, pre-members (ERM II or ERM-2 waiting area), EU non-members using the euro, and other EU countries (color blind accessible). Updated for July 2020 with the entry of Croatia and Bulgaria into the ERM-II.
The Eurozone, European Union, and other countries using the euro.
Map by Evan Centanni, from blank map by Ssolbergj. License: CC BY-SA

Croatia and Bulgaria preparing to adopt the euro

The southeastern European countries of Bulgaria and Croatia have been approved by the European Union's central bank to take the next step towards joining the Eurozone - the organization of countries that officially use the euro as their shared currency. As new participants in the "European Exchange Rate Mechanism II" (ERM II or ERM-2), Croatia and Bulgaria are on track to adopt the euro after a 2-3 year waiting period - likely on January 1, 2024.

Which Countries Use the Euro in 2020? (Map of the Eurozone)

Editor's Note: As of January 2023, the Eurozone now includes Croatia. The map and article below will soon be updated to reflect this.

This Eurozone map and explainer article have been updated to July 2020. The article was originally published in June 2016, and the earliest version of the map appeared in a 2014 news article.

Map of the Eurozone (euro area), showing which countries use the euro as their currency. Includes members, pre-members (ERM II or ERM-2 waiting area), EU non-members using the euro, and other EU countries (color blind accessible). Updated for July 2020 with the entry of Croatia and Bulgaria into the ERM-II.
The Eurozone, European Union, and other countries using the euro.
Map by Evan Centanni, from blank map by Ssolbergj. License: CC BY-SA

Article by Caleb Centanni, with additional content by Evan Centanni 

What is the Eurozone?

Officially called the "euro area", the Eurozone is a nickname for the group of countries in Europe that share a single currency, called the euro. The euro currency is administered by the European Union (EU), but many countries in the EU don't use the euro, and some countries outside the EU do use it. The European Central Bank, the governing financial body of the Eurozone, is headquartered in Frankfurt, Germany. Germany, along with eleven other EU countries, became a founding member of the Eurozone in 1999.

Tuesday, April 14, 2020

Schengen Border Controls in the Time of Coronavirus (April 14, 2020)

This map and article have been updated to April 14, 2020. You can also view the previous edition of the map, from March 27, with its accompanying timeline.

Since 2016, PolGeoNow has mapped reinstated border controls within Europe's Schengen free travel area, with the companion piece to this article covering changes from mid-2017 up to last month. Now, border controls between European countries have drastically expanded amid the global coronavirus pandemic. 

Read on for a country-by-country list of border controls and travel bans, plus a timeline of what went into effect when.

Schengen borders map showing temporary reintroduction of border controls in the Schengen Area (the European Union's border-free travel zone) as of April 14, 2020, during the widespread closure of internal Schengen borders due to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic. Also includes, in a different color, controls announced by governments where the EU has not been notified.
Map by Evan Centanni, from blank map by Ssolbergj. License: CC BY-SA
Article by Evan Centanni

Coronavirus-related Border Checks in the Schengen Area

As many travelers know, much of Europe is linked together as part of the "Schengen Area", a collection of countries that don't make travelers show any ID to cross the borders between them, and don't regulate what people bring across with them either (although this system is overseen by the European Union, the Schengen Area and the EU aren't the same thing). But under special circumstances, member countries can choose to temporarily resume border checks (also known as "border control").

Monday, April 6, 2020

Map: North Macedonia Joins NATO

Map of NATO allies in 2020, with all members including the newest country to join, North Macedonia (colorblind accessible).


Graphic modified by Evan Centanni from this map by Wikimedia user Addicted04 (CC BY-SA).

New NATO Ally: North Macedonia

Southeastern Europe's Republic of North Macedonia has been admitted as a full member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). Its membership officially went into effect on Friday, March 27, and a welcoming ceremony was held at the organization's headquarters the next Monday. North Macedonia is the 30th country to join NATO.

Membership had been promised to the country in exchange for striking a compromise in its dispute with NATO member Greece, who argued that the neighboring country was falsely claiming ownership of Greek history. Part of the deal, finalized in February 2019, was changing the country's name from "Republic of Macedonia" to "Republic of North Macedonia" - softening the implication that it's the heir to the ancient kingdom of Macedonia, which was mostly located in what's now Greece.

Friday, March 27, 2020

Schengen Border Controls in the Time of Coronavirus (March 27, 2020)

This is an older edition of our Schengen Area border controls map, preserved here with its accompanying timeline for the historical record. To read the full article and see the current map and country-by-country list of border controls, visit our updated Schengen border controls article.

Schengen borders map showing temporary reintroduction of border controls in the Schengen Area (the European Union's border-free travel zone) as of March 27, 2020, during the widespread closure of internal Schengen borders due to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic. Also includes, in a different color, controls announced by governments where the EU has not been notified.
Map by Evan Centanni, from blank map by Ssolbergj. License: CC BY-SA
Article by Evan Centanni

Coronavirus: Schengen Border Controls Timeline March 1-27, 2020

Border controls have proliferated within Europe's "Schengen Area", where there's normally no ID check required to travel from one country to another. For more details, and to see a current map and list country-by-country list of official controls, visit our updated Coronavirus Schengen Border Controls article. Continue reading this article for the timeline of changes to official border controls from the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak through March 27, as preserved from the previous edition of the article.

Map: Schengen Border Controls Before Coronavirus (2017-2020)

We mapped reinstated border controls within Europe's Schengen free travel area in March 2016, August 2016, February 2017, and August 2017, amid the past half-decade's surge of new refugee and immigrant arrivals. This article chronicles the history of the border checks from 2017 until just before the coronavirus pandemic of 2020. See the companion piece to this article for border controls during the coronavirus outbreak.

Schengen borders map showing temporary reintroduction of border controls in the Schengen Area (the European Union's border-free travel zone) as of February 2020, showing internal Schengen borders closed to passport-free travel just before the surge of new border controls enacted for the coronavirus outbreak. Map is also accurate for most of the period from from late 2019 through early 2020, and similar to the situation in 2018.

Changes to the way France is depicted compared to the previous map represent a stylistic adjustment, and not a change to the actual situation. Map by Evan Centanni, from blank map by Ssolbergj. License: CC BY-SA
Article by Evan Centanni

Border Controls Between Schengen Countries

As anyone who's visited Europe in recent decades knows, much of the continent is linked together as part of the "Schengen Area", a collection of countries that don't make travelers show any ID to cross back and forth across the borders between them - just walk on in (this system is overseen by the European Union, but the Schengen Area and the EU aren't the same thing). Though these borders are supposed to stay unregulated most of the time, the system does allow countries to temporarily reintroduce border controls under certain circumstances.

Map of the Schengen Area, Europe's Border-free Travel Zone

Editor's Note: As of January 2023, the Schengen Area now includes Croatia. The map and article below will soon be updated to reflect this.

What is the "Schengen Area"? What's the difference between Schengen and the EU? And which countries does Schengen include? Read on for all the answers, explained in plain English!

Important note: Though borders within the Schengen Area are normally completely open, countries can sometimes bring back temporary (or even long-term) ID checks. You can check for recent maps of the situation by viewing all Schengen border control articles on PolGeoNow. This is especially true during the 2020 global coronavirus pandemic, when many countries have not only brought back border controls, but are also turning away foreign travelers.

Map of the Schengen Area (the European Union's border-free travel zone), color-coded for EU Schengen countries, non-EU Schengen countries, future Schengen countries, and Schengen-exempt EU countries, as well as microstates unofficially participating in the Schengen agreements. Updated to 2020 for Brexit, removing the UK as a non-Schengen EU member. Colorblind accessible.
Map by Evan Centanni, from blank map by Ssolbergj. License: CC BY-SA

Saturday, February 8, 2020

Brexit: UK Leaves European Union (Plus: What Actually Changed?)

Map of the European Union, including all member countries, official candidate countries, and potential candidate countries, as of February 2020, updated for Brexit - the departure of the UK and Gibraltar (colorblind accessible). Also file under: Map of European Union Member Countries.

Map by Evan Centanni, from blank map by Ssolbergj. License: CC BY-SA

Britain Finally Exits EU

Last week, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - "UK" or "Britain" for short - became the first country ever to formally leave the European Union (EU).

This marks the turning point, but not the end, of the years-long saga nicknamed "Brexit" (short for "British exit"), which started with a 2016 referendum.

The long-delayed official exit finally arrived in the first second of February 1, 2020 at the EU headquarters in Belgium. Because of a time zone difference, this was 11:00 pm of January 31 in the UK. But because of a negotiated "transition period", most practical changes won't go into effect until at least the end of this year (read on for more about that).

The British territory of Gibraltar, located along the southern coast of Spain, was also pulled out of the EU alongside the UK.

How it Happened: A Concise Timeline of Brexit

Map of the European Union, including all member countries, official candidate countries, and potential candidate countries, as of February 2020, updated for Brexit - the departure of the UK and Gibraltar (colorblind accessible). Also file under: Map of European Union Member Countries.

Map by Evan Centanni, from blank map by Ssolbergj. License: CC BY-SA

UK Leaves EU: What Were They Doing All That Time?

Last week, the UK actually left the European Union, in a long-anticipated move called for by a referendum vote in 2016. This British exit, or "Brexit" was never meant to happen in less than two years - by how did it stretch out to almost four?

We've put together a clear and concise timeline summarizing the process, without any of the confusing technical lingo or agonizing political details. Enjoy!