Showing posts with label invasions. Show all posts
Showing posts with label invasions. Show all posts

Friday, March 1, 2024

Ukraine: Map & Timeline of Russian Control in October 2023

(To see other maps in this series, view all Ukraine articles on PolGeoNow.) Hidden image for crawlers

Map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine on October 9, 2023. In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbas region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and formerly declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces still controlled a wide belt of territory just north of Crimea, including large parts of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia provinces, as well as large additional areas of Donetsk and Luhansk provinces. Meanwhile, all of those provinces are now claimed by the Russian government as parts of Russia, creating a new claimed international border through what was until recently undisputed eastern Ukraine. From August to October 2023, Ukraine made some small advances, capturing two or three significant towns from Russian forces. Map includes key locations from the news, such as Robotyne, Synkivka, Sevastopol, Verbove, and more. Colorblind accessible.
Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic. Contact us for permission to use this map.

Timeline by Djordje Djukic

Map of territorial control within the claimed borders of the self-declared Donetsk People's Republic (DPR) and Lugansk People's Republic (LPR), which now consider themselves part of Russia, updated to October 9, 2023, months into Ukraine's 2023 counteroffensive. Map shows that the vast majority of the LPR, otherwise known as Ukraine's Luhansk province, is now under the control of Russia, while Russian forces also control over half of the DPR, or Ukraine's Donetsk province, including the major central and southern cities of Donetsk, Horlivka, Makiyivka, and Mariupol. Includes key locations from the news, such as Klischivka, Yakovlivka, Avdiivka, Marinka, Karmazynivka, and many more. Colorblind accessible.
Map showing what parts of the claimed territory of the self-declared Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics - now claimed as part of Russia - are controlled by Russian forces and allies, compared to the Ukrainian government. Click to enlarge. Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic. Contact us for permission to use this map.

Ukraine retakes towns amid slow-going counteroffensive

(The maps in this report show the situation as of October 9, 2023. Further territorial changes will be covered in an upcoming update.) 

Between our previous Ukraine control map of August 2023 and early October, Ukrainian forces managed to secure control of some significant towns and other locations from their Russian opponents, despite Russia having gained more ground overall since the beginning of the year.

Ukraine's capture of Robotyne town in Zaporizhzhia province marked a small step in its efforts to break the Russian "land bridge" of territory connecting Crimea and Donetsk, the focus of Ukraine's much-hyped but ultimately bloody and anticlimactic 2023 counteroffensive.

Meanwhile, the northeastern town of Synkivka was restored to full Ukrainian control after being partly occupied by Russian forces, and Klischivka town, south of the small eastern city of Bakhmut, was captured by Ukraine. In the Black Sea, Ukraine brought the war to the Russian stronghold of Crimea, capturing offshore oil rigs and launching damaging attacks on Russia's navy in Sevastopol.

Monday, December 11, 2023

Israel / Palestine: Map of Control After End of Truce (December 8, 2023)

Hidden image for crawlersThis map shows the approximate situation on November 8, a week after Israel and Hamas resumed fighting in the Gaza Strip after a seven-day "humanitarian pause". To see more maps in this series, view all Israel articles or Palestine articles on PolGeoNow.

Map of who controlled Palestine and Israel's claimed territories early on December 8, 2023, one month into the Israeli (IDF) ground invasion of the Gaza Strip, and a week after the end of the humanitarian pause (ceasefire/truce). Shows both Israeli and Palestinian Authority administration (Fatah and Hamas factions indicated separately). Includes bigger West Bank map (Area A, Area B, and Area C). Map also includes Gaza Strip, Golan Heights, major cities and Israeli settlements, UN peacekeeper deployments (UNIFIL in Lebanon and UNDOF in Syria), no man's land, Golan Heights buffer zone (area of separation, AOS), and Shebaa Farms. Now also shows Israel's closed military zones (closed military areas) and key towns and sites from the news, like Gaza City, Khan Yunis, Beit Hanoun, Jabalia, Erez Crossing, Jenin, and Kiryat Shmona (Qiryat Shemona). Now with improved colorblind accessibility.
Click to enlarge. Map by Evan Centanni, incorporating base map by Koen Adams of onestopmap.com and data from B'Tselem's interactive mapping project. (Contact us for permission to use this map.)

Timeline by Djordje Djukic, with additional reporting by Evan Centanni

Gaza Strip Divided

Just as we were publishing the previous edition of our Israel/Palestine control map, Israel began its long-expected counter-invasion into the Palestinian territory of the Gaza Strip, responding to hardline Palestinian group Hamas's unprecedented October 7 invasion of Israel. Now, one month into Israel's counter-invasion and two months into the war, the densely-populated Gaza Strip is divided between Hamas-led forces and the Israeli military. 

Israeli forces have seized large parts of Gaza City, the biggest population center in the densely-populated Strip, and completely surrounded the parts of it and nearby towns that are still under Hamas control. Meanwhile, since the temporary humanitarian ceasefire between Hamas and Israel ended a week ago, Israel has also pushed deep into the southern Gaza Strip city of Khan Yunis. For more information on control within the Gaza Strip, maps by online conflict-tracker Suriyak and ISW/Critical Threats give good detailed approximations.

Since our last report, Israel's military has appeared to confirm that it's killed at least about 5,000 Palestinian fighters and 10,000 Palestinian civilians, about ten times the respective numbers of Israeli soldiers and civilians killed by Hamas and allies in their brutal October 7 rampage through the Israeli countryside. This is roughly in line with estimates from the Hamas-affiliated Gaza Health Ministry, which as of Friday estimated a total of 17,000 Palestinians killed, about a third of them adult men (who are assumed to make up the vast majority of Hamas fighters).

Saturday, October 28, 2023

Israel / Palestine: Map of Control Before Israel's Gaza Invasion (October 27, 2023)

There are newer editions of this map available. To see them, view all Israel articles or Palestine articles on PolGeoNow.

This map shows the approximate situation early on October 27, 2023, before Israel's announced expansion of military activity within the Gaza Strip. At the time of publication, it's still unclear whether the expected Israeli ground invasion has begun, and little is known of the current situation within the Strip.

Map of who controlled Palestine and Israel's claimed territories early on October 27, 2023, before the expansion of Israeli operations in the Gaza Strip that may signal the start of the expected ground invasion. Shows both Israeli and Palestinian Authority administration (Fatah and Hamas factions indicated separately). Includes bigger West Bank map (Area A, Area B, and Area C). Map also includes Gaza Strip, Golan Heights, major cities and Israeli settlements, UN peacekeeper deployments (UNIFIL in Lebanon and UNDOF in Syria), no man's land, Golan Heights buffer zone (area of separation, AOS), and Shebaa Farms. Now also shows Israel's closed military zones (closed military areas) and key towns and sites from the news, like Sderot, Netivot, Erez Crossing, Rafah, Khan Yunis, Tulkarm, and Kiryat Shmona (Qiryat Shemona). Colorblind accessible.
Click to enlarge. Map by Evan Centanni, incorporating base map by Koen Adams of onestopmap.com and data from B'Tselem's interactive mapping project. (Contact us for permission to use this map.)

Timeline by Djordje Djukic, with additional reporting by Evan Centanni

2023 Israel-Hamas Control Map: Temporary Equilibrium

It's been almost three weeks since Palestinian group Hamas and allies burst unexpectedly out of the Gaza Strip, taking brief but unprecedented control over parts of Israel proper (see our map of the height of Hamas control). Israel's long-promised counter-invasion of the Strip may now be starting, two weeks after its military restored the lines of control to roughly the same as before the Hamas attack. But during the wait, there's been no end to violence: Israel has retaliated against Hamas with heavy bombing of that group's stronghold, the densely-populated Gaza Strip, while both Hamas in Gaza and allied Hezbollah in Lebanon have continued striking Israel with rockets and missiles launched across the borders. 

Israel reports that at least 1,400 of its people have been killed, including over 1,000 civilians - mostly in the first day of Hamas's October 7 invasion - while the Gaza Health Ministry says over 7,000 total Palestinian fighters and civilians have been killed, about 3,000 of them under the age of 18 (the ministry is part of the Hamas-dominated government of the Gaza Strip, but is generally evaluated as credible by outside observers).

Friday, October 13, 2023

Israel / Palestine Map: Height of Hamas Control in 2023 Invasion (October 7, 2023)

There are newer editions of this map available. To see them, view all Israel articles or Palestine articles on PolGeoNow.

This map shows the approximate situation on the afternoon of October 7, 2023, when control by Hamas and its allies reached farthest into Israel. Now, several days later, Israeli forces are thought to have reversed almost all those gains, returning the lines of control to roughly their same positions as just before the invasion.

Map of who controlled Palestine and Israel's claimed territories on the afternoon of October 7, 2023, at the greatest extent of penetration into Israel by the Hamas invasion. Shows both Israeli and Palestinian Authority administration (Fatah and Hamas factions indicated separately). Includes bigger West Bank map (Area A, Area B, and Area C). Map also includes Gaza Strip, Golan Heights, major cities and Israeli settlements, UN peacekeeper deployments (UNIFIL in Lebanon and UNDOF in Syria), no man's land, Golan Heights buffer zone (area of separation, AOS), and Shebaa Farms. Colorblind accessible. Also file under: Map of Hamas attack on Israel.
Click to enlarge. Map by Evan Centanni, incorporating base map by Koen Adams of onestopmap.com and data from B'Tselem's interactive mapping project. (Contact us for permission to use this map.)


Timeline by Djordje Djukic

2023 Israel-Hamas War: How much of Israel did Hamas Capture in its Invasion?

Last Saturday, just a day after the 50th anniversary of Israel's last full-scale war, the country was once again thrust into massive turmoil. In an unprecedented invasion of Israel proper, forces of hardline Palestinian party Hamas and smaller allied groups burst out of their stronghold in the Gaza Strip, briefly doubling their area of control while killing hundreds of Israeli civilians and soldiers alike. The above map shows the approximate situation at the height of Hamas and allied control, later on the same day that the invasion began.

Thursday, August 31, 2023

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control in August 2023 (Subscription)

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Research by Djordje Djukic. Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic

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Thumbnail previewing map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine on June 30, 2023. In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbas region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and formerly declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces still control a wide belt of territory just north of Crimea, including large parts of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia provinces, as well as large additional areas of Donetsk and Luhansk provinces. Ukraine has recently made small advances southward in Zaporizhzhia and western Donetsk. Meanwhile, all of those provinces are now claimed by the Russian government as parts of Russia, creating a new claimed international border through what was until recently undisputed eastern Ukraine. Map includes key locations from the news, such as Orikhiv, Velyka Novosilka, Piatykhatky, the Kakhovka Dam, and more. Colorblind accessible.

Ukraine's counteroffensive against Russian control has made modest progress, even as its forces lose a comparable amount of ground in bits and pieces along the rest of the front. In particular, Russia has pushed back into parts of Kharkiv province while Ukraine makes gains in the south.

(The maps in this report show the situation as of August 18. Territorial changes since that time, including the reported Ukrainian capture of Robotyne, will be covered in the next report.)

See all this and more on the latest update to PolGeoNow's concise, professional Ukraine war control map, which includes a detailed chronicle of changes and events since our previous Ukraine map report of June 30, with sources cited, as well as a close-up map of control within the claimed borders of the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics (which now claim to be self-governing regions within Russia).

This map and report are premium content, available to paid subscribers of the PolGeoNow Conflict Mapping Service.

Want to see before you subscribe? Check out our most recent FREE SAMPLE Ukraine map!

Exclusive map report includes:

  • Up-to-date illustration of current territorial control in Ukraine, color-coded for the Ukrainian government on one side and the Russian military and allied forces on the other side, with areas of uncertainty indicated. Colorblind accessible.
  • Darker color indicating which areas were already under Russian or allied control before the 2022 invasion began
  • Lines showing Russia's claimed border after its annexations of Donetsk, Luhansk, Zaporizhzhia, and Kherson provinces.
  • Preview thumbnail of map of territorial control within the claimed borders of the self-declared Donetsk People's Republic (DPR) and Lugansk People's Republic (LPR), which now consider themselves part of Russia, updated to June 30, 2023, after Russia completed its capture of Bakhmut. Map shows that the vast majority of the LPR, otherwise known as Ukraine's Luhansk province, is now under the control of Russia, while Russian forces also control over half of the DPR, or Ukraine's Donetsk province, including the major central and southern cities of Donetsk, Horlivka, Makiyivka, and Mariupol. Includes key locations from the news, such as Velyka Novosilka, Makarivka, Klischivka, Adviikva, and many more. Colorblind accessible.
    Donbas close-up map
    Close-up map of territorial control within the self-proclaimed boundaries of the Donetsk People's Republic and Lugansk People's Republic, which now claim to be part of Russia
  • Detailed indication of city-by-city control, including key towns and other locations important to current events
  • Locations of recent control changes and other important events, including Robotyne, Piatykhatky, Synkivka, Kyslivka, Kotlyarivka, Staromaiorske, Urozhaine, Berkhivka, Karmazynivka, and more
  • Detailed timeline of important events and changes to territorial control since June 30, 2023, with links to sources.

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Wednesday, July 12, 2023

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control Amid Ukrainian Counteroffensive - June 2023 (Subscription)

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Research by Djordje Djukic. Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic

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Thumbnail previewing map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine on June 30, 2023. In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbas region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and formerly declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces still control a wide belt of territory just north of Crimea, including large parts of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia provinces, as well as large additional areas of Donetsk and Luhansk provinces. Ukraine has recently made small advances southward in Zaporizhzhia and western Donetsk. Meanwhile, all of those provinces are now claimed by the Russian government as parts of Russia, creating a new claimed international border through what was until recently undisputed eastern Ukraine. Map includes key locations from the news, such as Orikhiv, Velyka Novosilka, Piatykhatky, the Kakhovka Dam, and more. Colorblind accessible.

Ukraine's long-anticipated counteroffensive has resulted in significant, but limited, territorial gains, while apparently falling short of its hoped-for goals so far. Meanwhile, the short-lived rebellion of Russia's paramilitary Wagner Group hasn't made any obvious differences to the territorial situation.

(The maps in this report show the situation as of June 30, about two weeks ago. Territorial changes since that time have been minor, and will be covered in the next report.) 

See all this and more on the latest update to PolGeoNow's concise, professional Ukraine war control map, which includes a detailed chronicle of changes and events since our previous Ukraine map report of May 27, with sources cited, as well as a close-up map of control within the claimed borders of the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics (now claimed to be self-governing regions within Russia).

This map and report are premium content, available to paid subscribers of the PolGeoNow Conflict Mapping Service.

Want to see before you subscribe? Check out our most recent FREE SAMPLE Ukraine map!

Exclusive map report includes:

  • Up-to-date illustration of current territorial control in Ukraine, color-coded for the Ukrainian government on one side and the Russian military and allied forces on the other side, with areas of uncertainty indicated. Colorblind accessible.
  • Darker color indicating which areas were already under Russian or allied control before the 2022 invasion began
  • Lines showing Russia's newly-claimed border after its annexations of Donetsk, Luhansk, Zaporizhzhia, and Kherson provinces.
  • Preview thumbnail of map of territorial control within the claimed borders of the self-declared Donetsk People's Republic (DPR) and Lugansk People's Republic (LPR), which now consider themselves part of Russia, updated to June 30, 2023, after Russia completed its capture of Bakhmut. Map shows that the vast majority of the LPR, otherwise known as Ukraine's Luhansk province, is now under the control of Russia, while Russian forces also control over half of the DPR, or Ukraine's Donetsk province, including the major central and southern cities of Donetsk, Horlivka, Makiyivka, and Mariupol. Includes key locations from the news, such as Velyka Novosilka, Makarivka, Klischivka, Adviikva, and many more. Colorblind accessible.
    Donbas close-up map
    Close-up map of territorial control within the self-proclaimed boundaries of the Donetsk People's Republic and Lugansk People's Republic, which now claim to be part of Russia
  • Detailed indication of city-by-city control, including key towns and other locations important to current events
  • Locations of recent control changes and other important events, including Orikhiv, Velyka Novosilka, Piatykhatky, Makarivka, the Kakhovka Dam, and more
  • Detailed timeline of important events and changes to territorial control since May 27, 2023, with links to sources.

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Saturday, June 3, 2023

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control After Capture of Bakhmut - May 2023 (Subscription)

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Research by Djordje Djukic. Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic

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Thumbnail previewing map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine on May 27, 2023. In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbas region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and formerly declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces still control a wide belt of territory just north of Crimea, including large parts of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia provinces, as well as large additional areas of Donetsk and Luhansk provinces. Meanwhile, all of those provinces are now claimed by the Russian government as parts of Russia, creating a new claimed international border through what was until recently undisputed eastern Ukraine. Map includes key locations from the news, such as Bakhmut (the small city recently captured by Russia), Synkivka, Uman, Pavlohrad, and more. Colorblind accessible.

Russia and its allies have completed their control of Bakhmut in Donetsk province after ten months of bloody battles for the small city. Fighting continues at many other places along the frontlines, including advances for both sides, though more of them in favor of Russia than Ukraine.

See all this and more on the latest update to PolGeoNow's concise, professional Ukraine war control map, which includes a detailed chronicle of changes and events since our previous Ukraine map report of March 26, with sources cited, as well as a close-up map of control within the claimed borders of the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics (now claimed to be self-governing regions within Russia).

This map and report are premium content, available to paid subscribers of the PolGeoNow Conflict Mapping Service.

Want to see before you subscribe? Check out our most recent FREE SAMPLE Ukraine map!

Exclusive map report includes:

  • Up-to-date illustration of current territorial control in Ukraine, color-coded for the Ukrainian government on one side and the Russian military and allied forces on the other side, with areas of uncertainty indicated. Colorblind accessible.
  • Darker color indicating which areas were already under Russian or allied control before the 2022 invasion began
  • Lines showing Russia's newly-claimed border after its annexations of Donetsk, Luhansk, Zaporizhzhia, and Kherson provinces.
  • Preview thumbnail of map of territorial control within the claimed borders of the self-declared Donetsk People's Republic (DPR) and Lugansk People's Republic (LPR), which now consider themselves part of Russia, updated to May 27, 2023, after Russia completed its capture of Bakhmut. Map shows that the vast majority of the LPR, otherwise known as Ukraine's Luhansk province, is now under the control of Russia, while Russian forces also control over half of the DPR, or Ukraine's Donetsk province, including the major central and southern cities of Donetsk, Horlivka, Makiyivka, and Mariupol. Includes key locations from the news, such as Novoselivske, Bilohorivka, Soledar, Pervomaiske, and many more. Colorblind accessible.
    Donbas close-up map
    Close-up map of territorial control within the self-proclaimed boundaries of the Donetsk People's Republic and Lugansk People's Republic, which now claim to be part of Russia
  • Detailed indication of city-by-city control, including key towns and other locations important to current events
  • Locations of recent control changes and other important events, including Bakhmut, Synkivka, Uman, Pavlohrad, and more
  • Detailed timeline of important events and changes to territorial control since April 21, 2023, with links to sources.

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Monday, April 24, 2023

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control in April 2023 (Subscription)

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Research by Djordje Djukic. Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic

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Thumbnail previewing map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine on April 21, 2023. In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbas region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and formerly declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces still control a wide belt of territory just north of Crimea, including large parts of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia provinces, as well as large additional areas of Donetsk and Luhansk provinces. Meanwhile, all of those provinces are now claimed by the Russian government as parts of Russia, creating a new claimed international border through what was until recently undisputed eastern Ukraine. Map includes key locations from the news, such as Bakhmut, Marinka, Synkivka, Orikhiv, and more. Colorblind accessible.

In recent weeks Russia has continued to slowly advance within the town of Bakhmut, with both sides making small gains in other parts of Donetsk and Luhansk. We've also made some small corrections to the map in Kharkiv and Zaporizhzhia provinces based on new information.

See all this and more on the latest update to PolGeoNow's concise, professional Ukraine war control map, which includes a detailed chronicle of changes and events since our previous Ukraine map report of March 26, with sources cited, as well as a close-up map of control within the claimed borders of the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics (now claimed to be self-governing regions within Russia).

This map and report are premium content, available to paid subscribers of the PolGeoNow Conflict Mapping Service.

Want to see before you subscribe? Check out our most recent FREE SAMPLE Ukraine map!

Exclusive map report includes:

  • Up-to-date illustration of current territorial control in Ukraine, color-coded for the Ukrainian government on one side and the Russian military and allied forces on the other side, with areas of uncertainty indicated. Colorblind accessible.
  • Darker color indicating which areas were already under Russian or allied control before the 2022 invasion began
  • Lines showing Russia's newly-claimed border after its annexations of Donetsk, Luhansk, Zaporizhzhia, and Kherson provinces.
  • Preview thumbnail of map of territorial control within the claimed borders of the self-declared Donetsk People's Republic (DPR) and Lugansk People's Republic (LPR), which now consider themselves part of Russia, updated to April 21, 2023. Map shows that the vast majority of the LPR, otherwise known as Ukraine's Luhansk province, is now under the control of Russia, while Russian forces also control over half of the DPR, or Ukraine's Donetsk province, including the major central and southern cities of Donetsk, Horlivka, Makiyivka, and Mariupol. Includes key locations from the news, such as Bakhmut, Marinka, Avdiivka, Bilohorivka, and many more. Colorblind accessible.
    Donbas close-up map
    Close-up map of territorial control within the self-proclaimed boundaries of the Donetsk People's Republic and Lugansk People's Republic, which now claim to be part of Russia
  • Detailed indication of city-by-city control, including key towns and other locations important to current events
  • Locations of recent control changes and other important events, including Bakhmut, Marinka, Avdiivka, Bilohorivka, and many more
  • Detailed timeline of important events and changes to territorial control since March 26, 2023, with links to sources.

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This map and report are not available for automated purchase to non-subscribers. If you need access or republication rights for only this map report, contact service@polgeonow.com for options.

Tuesday, March 28, 2023

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control in March 2023 (Subscription)

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Research by Djordje Djukic. Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic

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Thumbnail previewing map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine on March 26, 2023. In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbas region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and formerly declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces still control a wide belt of territory just north of Crimea, including large parts of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia provinces, as well as large additional areas of Donetsk and Luhansk provinces. Meanwhile, all of those provinces are now claimed by the Russian government as parts of Russia, creating a new claimed international border through what was until recently undisputed eastern Ukraine. Map includes key locations from the news, such as Bakhmut, Marinka, Kupiansk, Potemkin Island, and more. Colorblind accessible.

In the past month almost all territorial changes in Ukraine have been in favor of Russia, and mostly all within the Donetsk region. Though most of Russia's advances have been too small to show up on our maps, it's made major progress towards capturing the small city of Bakhmut.

See all this and more on the latest update to PolGeoNow's concise, professional Ukraine war control map, which includes a detailed chronicle of changes and events since our previous Ukraine map report of February 21, with sources cited, as well as a close-up map of control within the claimed borders of the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics (now claimed to be self-governing regions within Russia).

This map and report are premium content, available to paid subscribers of the PolGeoNow Conflict Mapping Service.

Want to see before you subscribe? Check out our most recent FREE SAMPLE Ukraine map!

Exclusive map report includes:

  • Up-to-date illustration of current territorial control in Ukraine, color-coded for the Ukrainian government on one side and the Russian military and allied forces on the other side, with areas of uncertainty indicated. Colorblind accessible.
  • Darker color indicating which areas were already under Russian or allied control before the 2022 invasion began
  • Lines showing Russia's newly-claimed border after its annexations of Donetsk, Luhansk, Zaporizhzhia, and Kherson provinces.
  • Preview thumbnail of map of territorial control within the claimed borders of the self-declared Donetsk People's Republic (DPR) and Lugansk People's Republic (LPR), which now consider themselves part of Russia, updated to March 26, 2023. Map shows that the vast majority of the LPR, otherwise known as Ukraine's Luhansk province, is now under the control of Russia, while Russian forces also control over half of the DPR, or Ukraine's Donetsk province, including the major central and southern cities of Donetsk, Horlivka, Makiyivka, and Mariupol. Includes key locations from the news, such as Bakhmut, Marinka, Torske, Pervomaiske, and many more. Colorblind accessible.
    Donbas close-up map
    Close-up map of territorial control within the self-proclaimed boundaries of the Donetsk People's Republic and Lugansk People's Republic, which now claim to be part of Russia
  • Detailed indication of city-by-city control, including key towns and other locations important to current events
  • Locations of recent control changes and other important events, including Bakhmut, Marinka, Pervomaiske, Torske, Potemkin Island, and many more
  • Detailed timeline of important events and changes to territorial control since February 21, 2023, with links to sources.

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Tuesday, February 28, 2023

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control in February 2023

There are newer editions of this map available. To see them, view all Ukraine articles on PolGeoNow.Hidden image for crawlers
Map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine on February 21, 2023. In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbas region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and formerly declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces still control a large strip of territory just north of Crimea, including large parts of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia provinces, as well as large additional areas of Donetsk and Luhansk provinces. Meanwhile, all of those provinces are now claimed by the Russian government as parts of Russia, creating a new claimed international border through what was until recently undisputed eastern Ukraine. Map includes key locations from the news, such as Bakhmut, Synkivka, Marinka, Snake Island, and more. Colorblind accessible.
Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic. Contact us for permission to use this map.

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Timeline by Djordje Djukic

Map of territorial control within the claimed borders of the self-declared Donetsk People's Republic (DPR) and Lugansk People's Republic (LPR), which now consider themselves part of Russia, updated to February 21, 2023. Map shows that the vast majority of the LPR, otherwise known as Ukraine's Luhansk province, is now under the control of Russian, while Russian forces also control over half of the DPR, or Ukraine's Donetsk province, including the major central and southern cities of Donetsk, Horlivka, Makiyivka, and Mariupol. Includes key locations from the news, such as Bakhmut, Krasna Hora, Ivanivske, Klischivka, Marinka, Vulhedar, and many more. Colorblind accessible.
Map showing what parts of the claimed territory of the self-declared Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics - now claimed as part of Russia - are controlled by Russian forces and allies, compared to the Ukrainian government. Click to enlarge.

Russian Advances: Steady, but Slow

In the month following our previous Ukraine war control map report, the advantage has remained with Russia, though not by much. 

While Ukraine has made some very small advances, Russian forces have achieved still-small but more-significant gains, nearly cutting off Ukrainian supply lines to the small city of Bakhmut in Donetsk.

Russia has also made small advances in the contested area west of Donetsk city, and in the northeastern corner of mostly-Ukraine-controlled Kharkiv province - the only remaining area of Russian control that it doesn't officially claim as part of Russia.

Meanwhile, Snake Island in the Black Sea is now known to be held by Ukraine, after reports following Russia's mid-2022 withdrawal had left the situation unclear.

This report describes the situation as of one week ago, on February 21, 2023.

Thursday, January 26, 2023

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control in January 2023 (Subscription)

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Research by Djordje Djukic. Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic

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Thumbnail previewing map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine on January 24, 2023, after Russia's capture of Soledar. In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbas region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and formerly declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces still control a large strip of territory just north of Crimea, including large parts of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia provinces, as well as large additional areas of Donetsk and Luhansk provinces. Meanwhile, all of those provinces are now claimed by the Russian government as parts of Russia, creating a new claimed international border through what was until recently undisputed eastern Ukraine. Map includes key locations from the news, such as Soledar, Bakhmut, Potemkin Island, Orikhiv, Vodanye, and many more Colorblind accessible.

Russia is again on the offensive in Ukraine, having captured a strategic town in Donetsk and entered a small city nearby - but only after weeks of grueling, bloody ground warfare. Small Ukrainian advances have taken place elsewhere, but are outnumbered by various small Russian ones.

See all this and more on the latest update to PolGeoNow's concise, professional Ukraine war control map, which includes a detailed chronicle of changes and events since our previous Ukraine map report of November 30, with sources cited, as well as a close-up map of control within the claimed borders of the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics (now claimed to be self-governing regions within Russia).

This map and report are premium content, available to paid subscribers of the PolGeoNow Conflict Mapping Service.

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Exclusive map report includes:

  • Up-to-date illustration of current territorial control in Ukraine, color-coded for the Ukrainian government on one side and the Russian military and allied forces on the other side, with areas of uncertainty indicated. Colorblind accessible.
  • Darker color indicating which areas were already under Russian or allied control before the 2022 invasion began
  • Lines showing Russia's newly-claimed border after its annexations of Donetsk, Luhansk, Zaporizhzhia, and Kherson provinces.
  • Preview thumbnail of map of territorial control within the claimed borders of the self-declared Donetsk People's Republic (DPR) and Lugansk People's Republic (LPR), updated to January 24, 2023, after Russia's capture of Soledar. Map shows that the vast majority of the LPR, otherwise known as Ukraine's Luhansk province, is now under the control of Russian and LPR forces, while Russian and DPR forces control over half of the DPR, or Ukraine's Donetsk province, including the major central and southern cities of Donetsk, Horlivka, Makiyivka, and Mariupol. Colorblind accessible.
    Donbas close-up map
    Close-up map of territorial control within the self-proclaimed boundaries of the Donetsk People's Republic and Lugansk People's Republic, which now claim to be part of Russia (based on the design of our classic map of rebel control in the Donbas, upgraded to include roads and terrain)
  • Detailed indication of city-by-city control, including key towns and other locations important to current events
  • Locations of recent control changes and other important events, including Soledar, Bakhmut, Potemkin Island, Orikhiv, Vodanye, and many more
  • Detailed timeline of important events and changes to territorial control since November 30, 2022, with links to sources.

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Sunday, December 4, 2022

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control After Kherson Retreat - Nov. 30, 2022 (Subscription)

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Research by Djordje Djukic. Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic

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Thumbnail previewing map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine on November 30, 2022, after Russia's withdrawal from Kherson city. In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbas region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and formerly declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces still control a large strip of territory just north of Crimea, including large parts of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia provinces, as well as large additional areas of Donetsk and Luhansk provinces. Meanwhile, all of those provinces are now claimed by the Russian government as parts of Russia, creating a new claimed international border through what was until recently undisputed eastern Ukraine. Map includes key locations from the news, such as Kherson, Snihurivka, Makiivka, the Kinburn Spit, cities hit by Russian airstrikes across Ukraine, and many more Colorblind accessible.

In the biggest-yet reversal of fortunes for Russia in its invasion of Ukraine, Ukrainian forces have re-assumed control of Kherson city, while Russia and allies have made much smaller advances along other parts of the frontline.

See all this and more on the latest update to PolGeoNow's concise, professional Ukraine war control map, which includes a detailed chronicle of changes and events since our previous Ukraine map report of November 7, with sources cited, as well as a close-up map of control within the claimed borders of the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics (now claimed to be self-governing regions within Russia).

This map and report are premium content, available to paid subscribers of the PolGeoNow Conflict Mapping Service.

Want to see before you subscribe? Check out our most recent FREE SAMPLE Ukraine map!

Exclusive map report includes:

  • Up-to-date illustration of current territorial control in Ukraine, color-coded for the Ukrainian government on one side and the Russian military and allied rebels on the other side, with areas of uncertainty indicated. Colorblind accessible.
  • Darker color indicating which areas were already under Russian or allied control before the 2022 invasion began
  • Lines showing Russia's newly-claimed border after its annexations of Donetsk, Luhansk, Zaporizhzhia, and Kherson provinces.
  • Preview thumbnail of map of territorial control within the claimed borders of the self-declared Donetsk People's Republic (DPR) and Lugansk People's Republic (LPR), updated to November 30, 2022, after the Russian withdrawal from Kherson city on a different part of the frontlines. Map shows that the vast majority of the LPR, otherwise known as Ukraine's Luhansk province, is now under the control of Russian and LPR forces, while Russian and DPR forces control over half of the DPR, or Ukraine's Donetsk province, including the major central and southern cities of Donetsk, Horlivka, Makiyivka, and Mariupol. Colorblind accessible.
    Donbas close-up map
    Close-up map of territorial control within the self-proclaimed boundaries of the Donetsk People's Republic and Lugansk People's Republic, which now claim to be part of Russia (based on the design of our classic map of rebel control in the Donbas, upgraded to include roads and terrain)
  • Detailed indication of city-by-city control, including key towns and other locations important to current events
  • Locations of recent control changes and other important events, including Kherson, Snihurivka, Makiivka, the Kinburn Spit, cities hit by Russian airstrikes across Ukraine, and many more
  • Detailed timeline of important events and changes to territorial control since November 7, 2022, with links to sources.

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Saturday, November 12, 2022

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control Before Kherson Retreat - Nov. 2022 (Subscription)

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Research by Djordje Djukic. Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic

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Thumbnail previewing map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine on November 7, 2022, just before Russia's withdrawal from Kherson city. In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbas region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and now-formerly declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces now control a large strip of territory just north of Crimea, including Kherson city and Mariupol, as well as most of Luhansk province and large additional areas of Zaporizhzhia and Donetsk provinces, but have lost most of their territory in Kharkiv province and some of their territory in Luhansk, Donetsk, and Kherson. Map includes key locations from the news, such as Lyman, Kupiansk, Davydiv Brid, Kreminna, the Crimean Bridge, and many more. Colorblind accessible.

(Note: This edition of our Ukraine control map captures the situation in the days prior to Russia's Kherson retreat, while our next report, coming soon, will document the results of the withdrawal itself.)

Despite small gains in Donetsk, Russia and allied forces were already losing major ground in Ukraine prior to this week's Kherson withdrawal. In the month or so leading up to the retreat, Ukraine had already captured significant parts Kherson and Kharkiv provinces, plus bits of Luhansk and other parts of Donetsk.

See all this and more on the latest update to PolGeoNow's concise, professional Ukraine war control map, which includes a detailed chronicle of changes and events since our previous Ukraine map report of September 26, with sources cited, as well as a close-up map of control within the claimed borders of the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics (now claimed to be self-governing regions within Russia).

This map and report are premium content, available to paid subscribers of the PolGeoNow Conflict Mapping Service.

Want to see before you subscribe? Check out our most recent FREE SAMPLE Ukraine map!

Exclusive map report includes:

  • Up-to-date illustration of current territorial control in Ukraine, color-coded for the Ukrainian government on one side and the Russian military and allied rebels on the other side, with areas of uncertainty indicated. Colorblind accessible.
  • Darker color indicating which areas were already under Russian or allied control before the 2022 invasion began
  • Lines showing Russia's newly-claimed border after its annexations of Donetsk, Luhansk, Zaporizhzhia, and Kherson provinces.
  • Preview thumbnail of map of territorial control within the claimed borders of the self-declared Donetsk People's Republic (DPR) and Lugansk People's Republic (LPR), updated to November 7, 2022, six months into the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Map shows that almost all of the LPR, otherwise known as Ukraine's Luhansk province, is now under the control of Russian and LPR forces, while Russian and DPR forces control over half of the DPR, or Ukraine's Donetsk province, including the major central and southern cities of Donetsk, Horlivka, Makiyivka, and Mariupol. Colorblind accessible.
    Donbas close-up map
    Close-up map of territorial control within the self-proclaimed boundaries of the Donetsk People's Republic and Lugansk People's Republic, which now claim to be part of Russia (based on the design of our classic map of rebel control in the Donbas, upgraded to include roads and terrain)
  • Detailed indication of city-by-city control, including key towns and other locations important to current events
  • Locations of recent control changes and other important events, including Lyman, Kupiansk, Davydiv Brid, Kreminna, the Crimean Bridge, and many more
  • Detailed timeline of important events and changes to territorial control since September 26, 2022, with links to sources.

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Tuesday, September 27, 2022

Ukraine: Map of Russian Control - September 2022 (Subscription)

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Research by Djordje Djukic. Map by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic

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Thumbnail previewing map of Russian-controlled territory in Ukraine on September 26, 2022. In addition to the Crimean peninsula, which Russia had already seized in 2014, and parts of the far eastern Donetsk and Luhansk provinces (the Donbass region) already controlled by Russia-backed separatist rebels (and declared independent as the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics), Russian forces now control a large strip of territory just north of Crimea, including Kherson city and parts of Mariupol, as well as all of Luhansk province and large additional areas of Donetsk provinces, but have lost most of their territory in Kharkiv province after a recent Ukrainian offensive. Map includes key locations from the news, such as Izium, Vysokopillia, Lyman, Pisky, Krasnohorivka, and many more. Colorblind accessible. Though slow Russian advances have continued in some areas, recent weeks have also seen a string of major Ukrainian victories, which have pushed Russian forces out of most of the areas they had controlled in Kharkiv province.

See all this and more on the latest update to PolGeoNow's concise, professional Ukraine war control map, which includes a detailed chronicle of changes and events since our previous Ukraine map report of August 22, with sources cited, as well as a close-up map of control within the claimed borders of the Donetsk and Lugansk People's Republics.


This map and report are premium content, available to paid subscribers of the PolGeoNow Conflict Mapping Service.

Want to see before you subscribe? Check out our most recent FREE SAMPLE Ukraine map!

Exclusive map report includes:

  • Up-to-date illustration of current territorial control in Ukraine, color-coded for the Ukrainian government on one side and the Russian military and allied rebels on the other side, with areas of uncertainty indicated. Colorblind accessible.
  • Darker color indicating which areas were already under Russian or allied control before the 2022 invasion began
  • Preview thumbnail of map of territorial control within the claimed borders of the self-declared Donetsk People's Republic (DPR) and Lugansk People's Republic (LPR), updated to September 26, 2022, six months into the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Map shows that all of the LPR, otherwise known as Ukraine's Luhansk province, is now under the control of Russian and LPR forces, while Russian and DPR forces control over half of the DPR, or Ukraine's Donetsk province, including the major central and southern cities of Donetsk, Horlivka, Makiyivka, and Mariupol. Colorblind accessible.
    Donbas close-up map
    Close-up map of territorial control within the self-proclaimed borders of the Donetsk People's Republic and Lugansk People's Republic (based on the design of our classic map of rebel control in the Donbas, upgraded to include roads and terrain)
  • Detailed indication of city-by-city control, including key towns and other locations important to current events
  • Locations of recent control changes and other important events, including Izium, Vysokopillia, Lyman, Pisky, Krasnohorivka, and many more
  • Detailed timeline of important events and changes to territorial control since August 22, 2022, with links to sources.

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