Thursday, January 28, 2021

Nagorno-Karabakh Conflict Map & Report: Aftermath - January 2021 (Subscription)

SUBSCRIBERS CLICK HERE TO PROCEED TO ARTICLE AND MAP

(To see more map reports in this series, view all Nagorno-Karabakh articles on PolGeoNow.)

Map by Evan Centanni, Djordje Djukic, Bourrichon, and Lesqual; article by Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic.

Subscribe for full access to all conflict map reports!

Preview thumbnail of map of territorial change in Nagorno-Karabakh before and after the 2020 war between Azerbaijan and the Armenia-backed, self-proclaimed Republic of Artsakh. Updated to January 28, 2020, to highlight locations of important events taking place in the aftermath of the peace deal's implementation. Colorblind accessible.
Though our map has barely changed since forces of Armenia and the self-proclaimed Republic of Artsakh completed their promised handovers of land to Azerbaijan two months ago, territory remains a major issue in the region. 
 
This subscriber-exclusive report goes in-depth on territorial issues and conflict-related developments since our previous Nagorno-Karabakh map and timeline at the beginning of December, with key sites of contention newly marked on this edition of the map.

This map and report are premium content, available to paid subscribers of the PolGeoNow Conflict Mapping Service.

Want to see before you subscribe? Check out our most recent FREE SAMPLE Nagorno-Karabakh map!

Exclusive map report includes:

  • Up-to-date illustration of current territorial control in Azerbaijan, Armenia, and the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region, including the self-proclaimed Republic of Artsakh, showing the differences between the situation before the war versus now. Colorblind accessible. 
  • Claimed borders of the Republic of Artsakh, as well as the former extent of the Soviet-era Nagorno-Karabakh Autonomous Oblast (NKAO).
  • Key locations of conflict and contention since the completion of Armenian withdrawals, including Khtsaberd, Shurnukh, Kapan, the Sotk gold mine, and more.
  • Detailed timeline of territorial contention and conflict events since Dec. 1, 2020, as well as key military/political developments, with sources cited. 

SUBSCRIBERS CLICK HERE TO PROCEED TO ARTICLE AND MAP

Not signed up yet? Click here to learn more about our professional subscription service!

Friday, January 22, 2021

US State of Mississippi Adopts New Flag

The new official flag of the US state of Mississippi, approved in a popular referendum on November 3, 2020 and formally adopted January 11, 2021. Features a white magnolia flower on a dark blue background, surrounded by 20 white stars topped with a golden star-like symbol. The left and right sides of the flag are red, separated from the blue center by thin golden borders.
Mississippi's new flag, officially adopted January 11, 2021 (public domain graphic).

50 State Flags Again

For the first time since last June, every one of the US's 50 states has its own flag. Last year, Mississippi became the only flagless state after its government voted to withdraw its former banner, controversial for incorporating the battle emblem of 19th Century pro-slavery separatists.

USA: Rhode Island State's Name Change

Map of the State of Rhode Island - formerly the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations - from the United States National Atlas
State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. The island hosting Newport (lower right) is the original "Rhode Island", while "Providence Plantations" referred to the mainland area around Providence (top right). (Public domain map)

Rhode Island Name Change Now in Effect

Tiny Rhode Island has become the first of the 50 US states ever to change its name.

Even many Americans don't realize that Rhode, Island, the smallest US state by area, actually had a longer official name until last year: State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. 

But in a referendum on Nov. 3, the same day as the 2020 US presidential election, the state's voters chose to amend the state constitution and shorten the name to just "State of Rhode Island". 

Monday, December 28, 2020

Yemen Control Map & Report - December 2020 (Subscription)

SUBSCRIBERS CLICK HERE TO PROCEED TO ARTICLE AND MAP

There are newer versions of this map available. To see them, view all Yemen articles on PolGeoNow.

Timeline by Djordje Djukic. Map by Evan Centanni, Djordje Djukic, and onestopmap.com

Map of what's happening in Yemen as of December 2020, including territorial control for the unrecognized Houthi government, president-in-exile Hadi and his allies in the Saudi-led coalition, the UAE-backed southern separatist Southern Transitional Council (STC), and Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP). Includes recent locations of fighting and other events, including Maas base, Lawdar, Al-Uqlah, Zinjibar, and more.
Subscribe for full access to all conflict map reports!

In the past two months, Yemen's Houthis have continued to gain ground against both the Hadi government and Al Qaeda, while the separatist conflict in the south moves closer to a possible resolution.

See all this and more on the newest update to PolGeoNow's Yemen territorial control map, which includes a timeline of changes and important events since our previous Yemen map report in October.

This map and report are premium content available to paid subscribers of the PolGeoNow Conflict Mapping Service.

Want to see before you buy? Check out our most recent FREE SAMPLE Yemen map report!

Exclusive report includes:
  • Up-to-date map of current territorial control in Yemen, color-coded for the pro-Hadi coalition, the separatist Southern Transitional Council (STC), Houthi forces, and Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP)
  • Detailed indication of town-by-town control, including provincial boundaries, all major cities, and many smaller ones
  • Markers for recent areas of fighting, including Maas base, Lawdar, Al Uqlah, Zinjibar, and more
  • Timeline of changes to the situation since October 30, 2020, with links to sources 

SUBSCRIBERS CLICK HERE TO PROCEED TO ARTICLE AND MAP

Not a member yet? Click here to learn more about our professional subscription service!

Can I purchase just this map?
This map and report are not available for automated purchase to non-subscribers. If you need access or republication rights for only this map report, contact service@polgeonow.com for options.

Tuesday, December 1, 2020

Nagorno-Karabakh Control Map & Timeline: Artsakh Withdrawals - December 1, 2020

There are newer versions of this map available. To see them, view all Nagorno-Karabakh articles on PolGeoNow.

This update on the (approximate) final results of the 2020 Azerbaijan-Armenia war is free for all readers.

Nagorno-Karabakh control map, showing territorial claims and control after the Azerbaijan-Armenia war, including the self-proclaimed Republic of Artsakh. Updated to December 1, 2020, at the approximate time of completion of all Artsakh/Armenian withdrawals promised under the 2020 peace agreement. Colorblind accessible.
Map of current territorial control. By Evan Centanni and Djordje Djukic, starting from this map by
Bourrichon and Lesqual. License: CC BY-SA
 
 
Timeline by Djordje Djukic
 

Artsakh/Armenian Forces Make Promised Withdrawals

Map of territorial change in Nagorno-Karabakh before and after the 2020 war between Azerbaijan and the Armenia-backed, self-proclaimed Republic of Artsakh. Updated to December 1, 2020, the date of approximate completion of the Artsakh/Armenia withdrawals from areas outside the NKAO. Colorblind accessible.
Click to enlarge: Map of territorial changes during and after the war
(For credit and license see main map above)

Three weeks after the peace deal that brought an end to the 2020 war between Azerbaijan and the Armenia-backed, self-proclaimed Republic of Artsakh, the latter side has completed the additional withdrawals it promised in the deal.

Though no official map has yet been released of the new lines of control, PolGeoNow has estimated their course based on news reporting and a comparison between information reported by various other online mapping projects.